A time to love and a time to hate; at time for war and a time for peace Eccleciastes 3:8

Solar flares are flying their way to the earth, and 2012 is supposed to be the year of Armageddon. I don’t know if I’m afraid of Armageddon, but I know that I would rather place my fate in the hands of a merciful God, than deal with the cruelty of men. The solar flares didn’t even impede my orders today. But mankind continues to seek and find new and clever ways to butcher each other.

The picture above is of Valley Forge. Brave men faced impossible odds for their families. They fought and died for a lost, hopeless cause. They froze to death, they starved to death. They faced death as rebels and traitors. And all of it was worth it, for them. They would rather suffer and die than live as slaves.

But we would rather bow to our masters, and be coddled and cared for by Big Brother from the time of our planned birth to the minute of our convenient death.

Somehow, when we think of the Founding Father‘s, we think of them as warmongers. We think that they were stupid jingoists that were eager to march their sons into a silly war just to show King George that we wouldn’t be bossed around. Nothing could be further from the truth. Most of the Founding Father’s truly hoped that they could avoid war. They only went to war when they felt it was inevitable. The Patriot shows this at the beginning, with Benjamin Farmer being against the war, until the British come on his own land and threaten the life of his son.

I’ve been reviewing the Federalist Papers. Its given me some insights into just what the Founding Father’s actually thought about war.

1. The founding father’s realized that it is human nature to be short-sighted.

Has it not, on the contrary, invariably been found that momentary passions, and immediate interests, have a more active and imperious control over human conduct than general or remote considerations of policy, utility, or justice?-Hamilton, Federalist 6

One of the reasons the Constitution is set up the way it is to prevent the sudden passion and immediate fad from dominating our national policy. Hamilton wanted the American people to make their great decisions in a ponderous, thoughtful manner. This relates especially to war. Going to war without just cause is a crime against God and humanity. Kings and tyrants did it all the time. But were republics really any better?

2. Hamilton demonstrates that republics were little better, historically, than monarchies when it came to fighting fruitless wars.

Sparta, Athens, Rome, and Carthage were all Republics; two of them, Athens and Carthage, of the commercial kind. Yet were they as often engaged in wars, offensive and defensive, as the neighboring monarchies of the times. Sparta was little better than a well-regulated camp; and Rome was never sated of carnage and conquest.-Hamilton. Federalist 6.

Let’s face it, there are reasons why some people prefer a monarchy. If you have a wise king, it may very well be better than a republic. Especially if that republic is intent on spreading it world-views via the sword! But then again, how likely is anyone to be a wise king?

And I’m afraid that America is by no means immune to the war sickness. Anyone remember the Mexican-American war (La Raza still isn’t over that one)? Have we forgotten that we virtually exterminated the race of the Native Americans (I work in Oklahoma….the survivors are sometimes thoroughly willing to remind me of past atrocities)? And have we ever really settled whether or not we should have been in Vietnam?

I’m going to post this video, even though I’m not sure of the veracity of every point. I know that much of it is true, but there are points in it I’m unsure of. But it has a strong message that, I think, really does need to be heard by Americans.

Ron Paul Revolution 8 Iran US history of war

3. The great Republics of the past either fell, or were transformed into more autocratic governments, because of their constant warfare.

Hamilton points out, in Federalist 6, that the Peloponnesian War (431-404 BC) led to the end of the Athenian Golden Age. It weakened both Athens and Sparta to the point that it was no real surprise that the autocratic Alexander the Great rolled over them. The Punic Wars completely destroyed Carthage. And it planted the seeds of imperialism in Rome (though it took nearly a century for those seeds to come to fruition). Aristotle felt that democracy was the worst form of government, because it tended to lead to anarchy that eventually led to tyranny. We’ve spent two centuries proving him wrong….but the Democrats and Republicans both are making me wonder if he was right.

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7 Responses to “A time to love and a time to hate; at time for war and a time for peace Eccleciastes 3:8”

  1. jeff

    great video very informative

  2. awayinthemanger

    Thanks guys. Sorry it took me so long to post something. I’m watching the kid today, but I don’t know if I’ll get anything out or not. The wifer has some ideas about what I should write. So I’ll try to amalgamate her ideas and mind.

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